Eel Aquaculture Team (EAT)

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Press

First Portuguese eel farming plant undergoes final phase editorial@fis.com
www.fis.com  
Thursday, November 12, 2015, 21:50 (GMT + 9)

Minister of Agriculture and Marine Affairs Assunção Cristas this week visited a new company that is dedicated to farming eels in Figueira da Foz, in which EUR 12 million has been invested, mostly funded by Norway. The fish farm, located in the town of Bom Sucesso, is equipped with high technology and is in the final stages of construction. It is expected to begin operating in 2016. The new plant received a community support of about EUR 3.9 million through PROMAR and EUR 8 million from a fund from Norway. The minister admitted that FindFresh entrepreneurs complained about the “difficulty of having accessible and cheap loans in Portugal in the crisis years,” but they ensured that nowadays, the situation is “different.” “It is an emblematic sophisticated investment, perhaps the most sophisticated in the world that is under construction at this time to farm eel,” stated Assunção Cristas. The company plans to annually produce 500 tonnes of eel that will have “superior quality” and one of its goals is to replace the imports of this fish, as it was expressed by FindFresh board chairman Paulo Vaz. The production process will begin with the purchase of eels in their larval stage from Spain. The person that is responsible for the company explained that as an eel takes about six years to develop in its natural environment, in FindFresh tanks, thanks to the modern technology used, and with water collected from a depth of 200 metres, “at a constant temperature of 25 degrees”, eels will take “just a year to grow,” Bomdia informed.

1. Resources from the Eel Workshop at the University of New England, October 16-17, 2014 Funded by the USDA Northeast Regional Aquaculture Center

Presentations

2. Results from the Sargasso Sea Commission Workshop at the USM, Portland, Maine, 23-25 October 2015

3. Important Information

References provided by Jim McCleave, Sara Rademaker, David MacNeill

Clevestam et al. 2011. Too short to spawn? Implications of small body size and swimming distance on successful migration and maturation of the European eel Anguilla anguilla

Couillard et al. 2014. Assessment of Fat Reserves Adequacy in the First Migrant Silver American Eels of a Large-Scale Stocking Experiment

Pratt and Threader. 2011. Preliminary Evaluation of a Large-Scale American Eel Conservation Stocking Experiment

Prigge. 2013. Tracking the migratory success of stocked European eels Anguilla anguilla in the Baltic Sea

Huertas and Cerda. 2006. Stocking Density at Early Developmental Stages Affects Growth and Sex Ratio in the European Eel (Anguilla anguilla)

Cote et al. 2009. Differential effects of origin and salinity rearing conditions on growth of glass eels of the American eel Anguilla rostrata: implications for stocking programmes

Kearney et al. 2008. Effects of salinity and temperature on the growth and survival of New Zealand shortfin, Anguilla australis, and longfin, A. dieffenbachii, glass eels

Ginneken et al. 2005. Eel migration to the Sargasso: remarkably high swimming efficiency and low energy costs. Journal of Experimental Biology 208: 1329-1335.

Nielsen & Prouzet.  2008. Capture-based aquaculture of the wild European eel (Anguilla anguilla). In A. Lovatelli & P.F. Holthus (eds). Capture-based aquaculture. Global overview. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 508. Rome, FAO. pp. 141–168.

Baltazar-Soares et al. 2014. Recruitment Collapse and Population Structure of the European Eel Shaped by Local Ocean Current Dynamics. Current Biology 24: 104–108

Cote et al. 2009. Differential effects of origin and salinity rearing conditions on growth of glass eels of the American eel Anguilla rostrata: implications for stocking programmes. Journal of Fish Biology 74: 1934–1948.

Henkel et al. 2012. First draft genome sequence of the Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Gene 511: 195–201.

F. Ottolenghi et al. 2004. Capture(eds). Capture-based aquaculture. Global overview. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 508. Rome, FAO. pp. 141–168.

One Response to Eel Aquaculture Team (EAT)

  1. Krystle McNeil says:

    To whom it may concern,
    Currently I am starting an eel farming project in the United States and need some assistance. I have a business partner who will be in Paris, France in a couple of weeks and would like to speak with someone who specializes in eel farming. If possible can you please email me names, numbers, email address, and the University of the individual’; anywhere in Europe will suffice. Please provide all necessary information so that my partner can speak directly in person with the people who can help assist us. Please email me a response or call me 323.309-1587.
    Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you soon.
    Best,
    Krystle

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